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Integrative Biosciences Center, Wayne State University
Detroit, MI
Clean science.
A world-class LEED biomedical research facility .
A historic building revived
The LEED Gold Wayne State University Integrative Bioscience Center (IBio) is designed to promote scientific discovery through team science. Henry Ford Hospital's Bone and Joint Center joins Wayne State University to create a true multidisciplinary research center that brings together 60 principal investigators, researchers, and clinicians from diverse disciplines.

A rigorous analysis of the existing building led to a reuse of the circa 1927 facility and restoration of the historic brick and stone fa􀀽ade. A new addition extending toward a major street is sheathed with a fritted glass curtainwall, producing a high¬tech counterpoint to the turn of the century historic structure. The exterior renovation utilizes multiple passive design strategies, including strategically located and sized fenestration, triple glazing, selective shading, and fritted glass and a light-colored roof to mitigate heat gain. The interior is filled with natural light, calming outdoor views, and has an airy, open floorplan to promote occupants’ comfort and well-being. The position of the facility on the prominent Woodward Avenue creates a gateway between the Wayne State University campus and Detroit's North End neighborhood, strengthening the connection between campus and community and acting as a catalyst to stimulate area economic recovery.
Results
LEED-Gold certified, IBio achieves every IEQ credit in LEED and exceeds AHSRAE 62 by 20%.
Thanks to both passive and active strategies including chilled beams the project achieved a measured energy consumption 60% below the Labs21 baseline.
Native and adaptive planting eliminate the need to irrigate.
Strategic re-use/repurposing of 75% of the original structure reduces the project’s impact on global warming by reducing the manufacturer of energy-intensive building components.
Fritted glazing and automatic shades reduce solar heat gain and glare saving energy and boosting occupant comfort while affording ample access to daylight and views.
Existing roof monitors were reconstructed to allow an abundance of diffused natural light through new light diffusing Kalwal panels.
Low flow plumbing fixtures reduce indoor water consumption by 40%.
The completed building is 3,000 square feet smaller than the program, yielding a first-cost savings of $1.1 million plus significant reductions in life cycle costs.
Project Data
Integrative Bioscience Center (IBio) 2011-10087-000
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI
PROJECT SCOPE
Adaptive Reuse
HED ROLE
Design Architect, Structural Engineering, Mechanical/ Plumbing Engineering, Electrical Engineering
RSF/GSF
205,700
CONSTRUCTION COST
$77.0 Million
SUSTAINABILITY LEVEL
LEED Gold

LEED Gold

2017

Project Team
  • Christopher Vogelheim
    AIA, LEED AP
    Principal
    Sector Leader
  • Charles Jacobs
    ASLA, PMP, LEED AP BD+C
    Associate Principal
    Project Management Leader
  • Shaun Rihacek
    LEED AP
    Associate
    Design
  • Barrett Newgeon
    PE, LEED AP, LC
    Associate
    Electrical Engineering
  • Christopher George
    Associate
    Design
  • Kirk Pesta
    PE, LEED AP
    Principal
    Mechanical Engineering Leader
  • Jim Corsiglia
    PE, SE, LEED AP
    Principal
    Structural Engineering Leader
  • Timothy Gawel
    Associate
    Sector Leader
  • Kam Chow
    Electrical Design
  • Brian Fiander
    PE, LEED AP BD+C, MBA
    Associate
    Electrical Engineering
  • Eric Mitchell
    PE
    Associate
    Mechanical Engineering
  • Lauren Roller
    PE
    Associate
    Structural Engineering
  • Matthew Bednarczyk
    RA
    Architecture
A world-class LEED biomedical research facility .
Integrative Biosciences Center, Wayne State University
Detroit, MI
PROJECT DATA
PROJECT TEAM

LEED Gold

2017

Clean science.